Shed And Outbuildings

Shed And Outbuildings

An outbuilding is any permanent structure within the boundary of your home – this can include sheds, garages, summerhouses, greenhouses and guest houses. A shed is typically only used to store objects, whether it be work tools or yard tools; while a garage typically is meant to store a car, and can store other objects

A shed is typically a simple, single-story roofed structure in a back garden or on an allotment that is used for storage, hobbies, or as a workshop. Sheds vary considerably in their size and complexity of construction, from simple open-sided ones designed to cover bicycles or garden items to large wood-framed structures with shingled roofs, windows, and electrical outlets.

Sheds are used to store home and garden tools and equipment such as lawn tractors, and gardening supplies. In addition, sheds can be used to store items that are not suitable for indoor storage, such as petrol (gasoline), pesticides, or herbicides. For homes with small gardens or modest storage needs, there are several types of very small sheds. The sheds not only use less ground area but also have a low profile less likely to obstruct the view or clash with the landscaping.

These small sheds include corner sheds, which fit into a corner (3 ft tall × 3 wide × 2 deep, or about 1 m tall × 1 m wide × 50 cm deep), vertical sheds (5 ft × 3 ft × 4 ft deep, or 1.5 m × 1 m × 1 m), horizontal sheds (3 ft × 5 ft × 4 ft or 1 m × 1.5 m × 1 m), and tool sheds. When a shed is used for tool storage, shelves and hooks are often used to maximize the storage space.

Many sheds have either a pent or apex roof shape. A pent shed features a single roof section which is angled downwards to let rainwater run off, with more headroom at the front than the back. This is a simple, practical design that will fit particularly well next to a wall or fence. It is also usually lower than the typical apex shed, so could be a better choice if there are any height restrictions. A pent shed may be free-standing or attached to a wall (when it is known, unsurprisingly, as a wall shed).

A pent shed is distinguished by its single sloping roof. The highest point of the roof is usually located on the same side as the door offering the maximum height available. If you have a reverse pent shed, the highest point of your single sloping roof will be on the opposite side of the door.

Additional info for Outbuildings

Outbuildings are separate structures used for a purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the dwellinghouse (that is they are not attached to the dwellinghouse), and may include structures such as:

  • Sheds
  • Greenhouses
  • Garages
  • Swimming pools
  • Sauna cabins
  • Kennels
  • Tennis courts
  • Containers used for domestic heating oil or petroleum gas.
  • The keeping of poultry, bees, pets, birds or other livestock for the domestic needs or personal enjoyment of the occupants of the dwellinghouse.

 

Outbuildings may be considered permitted developments, not requiring planning permission if:

  • They are not forward of a wall forming the principal elevation.
  • They are single storey with a maximum eaves height of 2.5 m and maximum overall height of 4 m with a dual pitched roof or 3 m for any other roof.
  • They have a maximum height of 2.5 m in the case of a building, enclosure or container within two metres of a boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse.
  • They do not have verandas, balconies or raised platforms.
  • No more than half the area of land around the original dwellinghouse would be covered.

Building Regulations approval will not normally be required if the floor area of an outbuilding is less than 15 sq. m and it does not contain any sleeping accommodation.

If the floor area of an outbuilding is between 15 sq. m and 30 sq. m, Building Regulations approval will not normally be required if it does not contain any sleeping accommodation and it is either at least 1 m from any boundary or it is constructed of substantially non-combustible materials.

Helpful Info about Outbuildings security

Thefts from gardens and outbuildings has been on the rise in recent years. Which? reported that between 2012-14, 342 laptops, 387 computers and 447 phones were stolen from sheds in the London area alone. (Ref. https://conversation.which.co.uk/home-energy/shed-theft-home-insurance-valuables/)

An outbuilding can be a greenhouse, garden shed, workshop, and so on. They should all be made as secure as possible to protect from crime. Being a victim of crime can be made worse by being subject to higher insurance premiums. If correct security measures are in place, property owners can benefit from around 5% reduction in premiums.

Outbuildings security
Thefts from gardens and outbuildings has been on the rise in recent years. Which? reported that between 2012-14, 342 laptops, 387 computers and 447 phones were stolen from sheds in the London area alone. (Ref. https://conversation.which.co.uk/home-energy/shed-theft-home-insurance-valuables/)

An outbuilding can be a greenhouse, garden shed, workshop, and so on. They should all be made as secure as possible to protect from crime. Being a victim of crime can be made worse by being subject to higher insurance premiums. If correct security measures are in place, property owners can benefit from around 5% reduction in premiums.

Some measures to improve security for outbuilding entrances and property boundaries include:

  • Regularly checking for damage and repairing it as soon as possible.
  • Installing an alarm.
  • Installing a CCTV system.
  • Installing external doors with a minimum thickness of 44 mm, with securely-fixed frames.
  • Ensuring the boundary is of an effective height to be secure, e.g. around 2 m high.
  • Increasing fence security with anti-climb paint or ‘prickler’ strips along the top (these measures will require a warning sign to be visible).
  • Gravel driveways and/or a driveway alarm.
  • Motion sensor lights on a driveway.
  • Filling gaps or extraneous access points with planted trees, a bollard or some other means of blocking.
  • Tall hedges can enhance privacy, but in front gardens they can help to make intruders less visible from the street.
  • Prickly plants under ground floor windows can act as a deterrent.

Some measures to improve security for outbuilding doors and windows include:

  • Securely locking doors with strong padlocks (with Kitemark).
  • Securing door hinges with coach bolts or non-returnable screws.
  • Ensuring that exterior hinges are inaccessible from outside.
  • Perspex or polycarbonate can be used as a more secure alternative material for windows.
  • Net curtains or coloured film can prevent a clear view inside.
  • Checking regularly for wear and tear. Replace rotten timber doors or window frames.
  • If possible, consider using a mortised deadlock midway on the door, with a latch lock above it.

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